The need to pay heed to Afghanistan in Trump presidency

Sunday, 22 January 2017 04:16 Written by  Heart of Asia Read 107 times

Donald J Trump has been sworn in as the 45th president of the United States of America in Washington DC in a ceremony attended by thousands of people and watched live on TV in most of other countries. Trump delivered a short but emotional speech at his inauguration, lambasting former government officials and reiterating his campaign promises. The time of seeking to impose the American way of life on other people has passed, he stressed, pledging to eliminate terrorism from the “face of the Earth”.

 

His anti-terrorism statement is promising because there was a lot of suspicion of US intention in the war on terror, even to the extent that the world power was accused of exploiting terror outfits to protect its interests and goals. Unlike the current US policy, if Trump embraces an approach to honestly fight against terrorism and give up imposing American values on other nations, it will put a positive impact not only on the situation of the United States, but also of the entire world. Today, many nations pay the piper of American values foisted on them, and are therefore in turmoil. 

In his inaugural address, President Trump reaffirmed his position to put America first in everything, an issue begetting concerns in terms of global engagement and relations. He, for instance, said the former US administrations have spent trillions of dollars to defend other nations, while they had forgotten the United States. This rings alarm bells for Afghanistan, whose military and civilian institutions are still bankrolled by the US and its allies. 

Afghanistan, which is at the epicenter of the US-led global coalition war on terror for about a decade and half, has some achievements requiring continued international support and assistance to be preserved. 

The international assistance to Afghanistan serves not only Afghans, but also is necessary for global security through the protection of Afghanistan. If the experience of deserting Afghanistan following the defeat of Soviet Union is to be repeated, the possibility of a repeat of incidents like the 9/11 also cannot be ignored.