The repatriation of refugees from Europe, and the fear of another headache

Tuesday, 04 October 2016 03:37 Written by  Heart of asia Read 197 times

The deteriorating security and economic situation has prompted some Afghans to flee the country. A lot of people headed towards European countries through dangerous routes over the recent years to seek refuge there. According to the statistics of international organizations on refugees, Afghans make up the second largest refugee population in Europe after Syrians. Although these people have fled the country because of the war and other adversities, and made it to Europe after suffering a lot of difficulties on the way, most of the European countries don’t accept their asylum applications.
The Afghan government says that the asylum applications of 60 percent of Afghan refugees in Europe have been rejected, and they will perhaps be deported back to the country. Meanwhile, the German Ministry of Interior has said that Kabul and Berlin have agreed on Afghan refugee repatriation mechanism.


Many European countries, including Germany, don’t accept the asylum applications of Afghan refugees, arguing that not all parts of Afghanistan are insecure. According to them, the refugees whose asylum applications have been turned down should head home, and resettle in relatively safe regions. Germany has also seemingly offered to assist the government in the resettlement of the returnees; however, this is not what the solution should be, because the simultaneous homecoming of about 80,000 people, and the provision of life facilities for them is, if not impossible, a laborious task which can spell a new trouble for the already embattled Afghan government.
The quest for safety is not the only reason for Afghans fleeing the country for Europe. The second biggest challenge forcing the people of Afghanistan to leave the country is employment and economic constraints. Over the recent years, lots of people have lost their jobs, and spent all their money on the risky journeys to Europe, and even some of the refugees have sold all their properties here. If repatriated back home, the refugees neither have the necessary capital to start businesses nor are there work opportunities for them to utilize. Additionally, the resettlement of all the returnees in comparatively safe areas also doesn’t seem feasible as those areas are currently overcrowded, and jobs are also very limited there.
Instead of repatriating refugees in the existing unfavorable situation, the National Unity Government should, in coordination with the international community, adopt a strategy to help this very defenseless population, while also averting yet another problem being loaded on the government’s plate.