Civilian casualties in US airstrikes, possible perils

Monday, 14 August 2017 02:27 Written by  Heart of Asia Read 69 times

Civilian casualties are one major driver of the Afghan conflict. The more the death toll of non-combatants, the more the hopes of people for peace in the country fade away, because such incidents, especially those involving foreign troops, strengthen the mentality of revenge among the people. As justice is not delivered for families of those killed or wounded by foreigners, they are left with one option, to exact their revenge on the killers, and fighting becomes the only way to do so. The escalation of war then increases civilian casualties, thereby leading to the continuation of the imposed conflict, which has deprived Afghans of having a better life for decades.

 

The incidents of civilian casualties caused by international troops are more provocative than ones involving Afghans. But despite all that, the National Unity Government is completely silent on the killing of its citizens by Americans. Since taking up office, neither the president nor the chief executive officer has ever condemned the killing of civilians in US airstrikes. At the time of such incidents, they mostly behave as if Americans have the authorization to kill Afghans, and no one has the right to question them for the bloodshed. 

Government leaders may be turning a blind eye to the arbitrary actions of Americans in order to stay in power or for other reservations, they should never forget about facing with the wrath of the nation. If American arbitrariness and government silence continue as now, it will have grave consequences. 

 

If government leaders and the United States don’t want to witness further deterioration of the situation in Afghanistan, they should pay keen attention to the lives of Afghan civilians, because it will finally prompt the nation caught between a rock and a hard place to rise against either or both of them, and once they label the government and Americans as enemies, neither government leaders will have the chance to rule the country, nor will Americans have a reason to expect Afghans to remain committed to the war on terror. Before the conditions become tougher for Afghan government and the United States, both of them should pay more attention to civilian lives.