Possibility of US troop surge

Sunday, 18 June 2017 03:28 Written by  Heart of Asia Read 42 times

With six months already passed since its inauguration, the Trump-led new US administration is yet to declare its policy on Afghan war, the longest foreign war in the history of United States. While Trump administration was expected to announce its new Afghan policy prior to NATO summit in May, it has not happened yet, with some reports suggesting it will be declared by mid-July. 

 

Trump was initially expected to put an end to Afghan conflict, but his actions showed he is following in his predecessor’s footsteps. Although the details of the new policy are yet to become public, troop surge constitutes its main element. It was the very mistake repeated twice by former US president, Barrack Obama, the fallouts of which are obvious to everyone.  

Trump has given the authority to define troop level in Afghanistan to Pentagon. Recently, there have been some reports that US Defense Secretary Gen. James Mattis, known as ‘Mad Dog’ and who has experience in Afghanistan and Iraq, has decided to deploy 4,000 additional American troops to Afghanistan. Even though the Pentagon spokeswoman has said no decision has yet been made on troop level, the Pentagon is mostly likely to accept the troop surge proposal put forward by the general commander of US forces in Afghanistan.

Given the past experience, and the ground realities in Afghanistan, all side involved in the Afghan conflict, even seemingly the United States, believe there is no military solution to the Afghan conflict. Nonetheless, US governments have never made any real attempts to settle the conflict through peaceful and political channels. They have always put emphasis on use of force, which has always backfired. Also this time, Americans in a way emphasize on the military solution by deploying more troops to Afghanistan in a bid to force the Taliban to come to the negotiating table with Afghan government. There are two possibilities in this case; firstly, the Americans really don’t know that Afghan conflict doesn’t have a military solution, and they are never expected to be so; the second possibility is that Americans don’t want the Afghan conflict to be settled politically. All actions taken by the United States so far lend credence to the second scenario, which has worried not only Afghans, but also the regional nations.