HIA, Jamiat should not pour salt into people’s wounds

Monday, 08 May 2017 03:26 Written by  Heart of Asia Read 67 times

As expected, the possibility of a political clash between Hizb-e-Islami and Jamiat-e-Islami parties is on the rise after the return of HIA leader, Gulbuddin Hekmatyar, to Kabul.

 

Following two public addresses by Hekmatyar in Kabul, Jamiat called on him in a press statement to eschew implicitly criticizingJamiat. It also says that today’s political rhetoric is different than that in the years of Afghan civil war, urging HIA to realize such difference. Similarly, the supporters of the Afghan Green Trend, a political movement led by former spymaster, Amrullah Saleh, had also staged a protest demo on the return day of Hekmatyar to Kabul. 

There were predictions about a political opposition between Hizb-e-Islami and Jamiat-e-Islami parties as long-time rivals. Both parties, which consider themselves as the most deserving recipients of concessions among other Jihadi groups, were also the major actors of the civil war. An armed confrontation between the two sides during the internecine war ruined Kabul, and caused casualties to thousands of Kabul residents. 

Now that Hekmatyar has joined the peace process, both sides need to show restraint. Instead of pillorying each other, HIA and Jamiat should compete with each other in the light of Afghan laws so as to benefit people other than harm them. 

Also, peace with Hekmatyar should serve as a model for other militants so that they are also encouraged to join the mainstream political process not that they are offered another justification to continue the war. 

 

Afghans still remember the activities of HIA and Jamiat because most of the victims of their atrocities or their children are still alive. Neither side is innocent so that they are trying to criticize each other or portraying themselves to be operating in favor of the people. If the people can tolerate the dark past of both of them for the sake of peace and prevention of the repetition of the bitter experience, they should also avoid the blame game if they wish to recognize the nation’s tolerance of their past. If there had ever been an opportunity of stability and transitional justice in the country, most senior officials of both parties would have stood trial in impartial courts and faced the music other than dreaming to rule the people. 

 

HIA and Jamiat should try to embrace the opportunity to have a healthy, logical political competition in the light of the country’s applicable laws and respect to the will of people. These political parties should try to heal the wounds of the poor Afghan people than rub salt into their wounds.