More concessions from gov’t bone of contention between Jamiat leaders

Tuesday, 27 December 2016 04:29 Written by  Heart of Asia Read 87 times

Negotiations over a possible deal between President Ashraf Ghani and Acting Balkh Governor Atta Mohammad Noor have apparently irked some leaders of Jamiat Islami Afghanistan Party, particularly those hailing from Panjsher province as they accuse Noor of holding no consultations with them over the issue. Meanwhile, Noor’s loyalists declare the Chief Executive Officer Dr. Abdullah Abdullah cannot represent Jamiat and has failed to fully implement the power-sharing agreement of the National Unity Government (NUG). According to them, Abdullah has not yet honored his promise of changing the currently centralized presidential government into a federal system within two years.  

 

 

The crack between Jamiat leaders is not a new issue; there had been several similar instances, but they have reunited when their common partisan interests were threatened. Thus, it is hard to believe that the current opposition is real and serious because it is largely viewed as a decoy to secure more concessions from the government. 

Noor is hyping the potential deal between Jamiat and the president as if it is meant to prop up the government. Even if that is the case, Jamiat now has more representation in the government than any other party, so what is the need for another agreement, then. It is also not justifiable that Dr. Abdullah cannot truly represent the group because Noor’s influence over him is crystal clear. Everyone knows well that Abdullah has taken every action since the inception of the NUG in consultation with Noor and other party leaders. 

The most important issue here is the president’s stance against Jamiat and whether the split between Jamiat leaders is real or not. The president needs to be overcautious in dealing with the party, should not repeat the mistake of the NUG’s power-sharing deal and not give more concessions to Jamiat under one name or another. Any possible deal with the party can be construed as if the government is treating political parties differently, which will do more harm than good to the government since other parties will perhaps show a strong reaction to the deal, thereby creating a new headache for the embattled National Unity Government.